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, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
level that the last government only introduced before the election. keeping our promise on winter fuel payments, taking all of those steps and making sure, again, something never done by the party opposite that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
and put people back to work. and despite that conversation, and despite the election results, the position that's been taken on the part of some house republicans is that, "no, we've got to do it our way, and if we don't, we simply won't pay america's bills." well, that can't be a position that is sustainable over time. it's not one that's good for the economy now. it's certainly not going to be the kind of precedent that i want to establish not just for my presidency, but for future presidents, even if it was on the other side. forocrats don't like voting the debt ceiling when a republican is president, and yet you -- but you never saw a situation in which democrats suggested somehow that we would go ahead and default if we didn't get 100 percent of our way. that's just not how it's supposed to work. jon karl. >> thank you, mr. president. on the issue of guns, given how difficult it will be -- some would say impossible -- to get any gun control measure passed through this congress, what are you willing or able to do, using the powers of your presidency, to act without congress? and i'd al
to the election if they declare that he dies tomorrow which there is a rumor that they would do that actually going around now, that if he would be declared dead and they called an election within 30 days and the opposition won, meaning the sympathy vote for the candidate which is difficult after what we saw on december 16th and dhaka election we just talked about, chavez has 20 of 23 governors. 11 of the governors that were run by the chavez party are former military officials, including four ministers of defense, who are now governors of their respective states. several of them are all along the office of the control campaign list because of their work with the farc so we have a situation where people are in control of things, so that even if henry embrey de four e elected president in this election it's the opposite -- he's the head of the opposition who ran against chavez and got a 45% to 55% but we are talking about to the even if he was to win, he still would have institutions that are controlled by the chavez government including the supreme court which we just pointed out, including t
of the election year, yet you don't have presidential candidates to have a vastly different approach to it. >> it is true that i think it is the increasingly become an issue, and the heartland of america, especially in the south. for instance in north carolina, there's been a huge increase in the latino population of north carolina, but most people don't understand how those latinos got there. it is a largely guatemalan migration, and its large the people who were recruited in the 1980's and 1990's to come and work in the textile mills of north carolina, because part of what i try to show in the book is the enormous connection between the needs of capital of american expanding industries in the u.s. and this recruitment of labor. what happened basically is in the 1980's, more salvadorans and guatemalans were flocking to the united states as a result of the civil wars and their country and repression in their country. they came here to the u.s. and there were industries that were needed for cheap labor. you have the meat packing industry in the midwest that began recruiting many mexicans to
magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who resided in the southern states in 1860. nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved, was owned outright by other people. and on the markets of the day, those nearly four million human beings were worth something like $3 billion. that was an immense sum at the time. it was a sum greater than the value of all the farmland in all the states of the south. it was a sum fully three times as great as the cost of constructing all the railroads that then ran throughout all the united states. to give you some idea of just what those human bodies were worth. but even more important to southern wealth than the sale price of these human bodies was
. >> this was an inaugural address where the president came out said i won the election and i'm going to be aggressive in the second term about pushing my agenda. >> and i think we had a clarifying moment and the president's speech put to rest, put to rest the idea that barack obama is a moderate. barack obama is a liberal. >> i don't think that absolutism, i'm sure the president would say the same, on the part of either party or any politician is helpful in terms of solving problems and obviously, if we're going to move forward we're going to have to find a way to come together to solve these problems. >> now dually reelected, he intends to pursue the course of that liberalism. he's going to pursue it as if he had from the election an enormous mandate. >> when i heard that was a liberal speech, i don't think it was a liberal speech, i think it's a popular speech. >> and the battle lines are clearly drawn and i don't think there's hope of-- barring unforeseen developments, that we'll have the unity that people in washington wished for so long. >> we believe strongly there are areas in common that we c
in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater you see who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shored up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom in its early chaotic days and in for some order of discipline on the spirit to read national review, expanded the conservative movement through the tv program the epic it's, his newspaper column and his lectures in champion ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the act there turned politician. bill rusher loved american politics, rare wines, traveling to distant lands and national review's effervescent editor bill buckley of whom he once said quote the most exasperating people in the world are so often the most beloved, and he is no exception. now da
president being re-elected, having a second inauguration today? >> i believe that he would have been very happy to know that america has moved to a place that they are able to elect a president, not based on the color of his skin, but as he talked about, the content of his character. and that, he would be very happy about. i think the state of where we are, divided on so many different things, unfortunately, that's unacceptable. we must become united, united states of america, but i think the majority of the people are saying, listen, let's do away with these old habits, these old things that need to be dead and gone, and move on to really bringing our nation together. and i think he would say that. time to move on and make it better and get it right. >> well, i'm very excited about tonight. looking forward to your performance. and if you do need me, i will be in close proximity and available. >> start warming up. warm up, mate. >> all right, buddy. >> good to see you. >> good to see you, take care. >> i tell you what, stevie wonder has a very good english accent. he had it right down to
not been dissolved and the election committee will function in the same way it always has. qadri has remained controversial due to his motives and finances but forced the government to listen to his commands and they criticized the government for allowing thousands in the capitol. but that those in charge should be held accountable. >> all the people who are elected in the parliaments are servants of the public and those who are elected should never forget that they are the servants. >> the government had warned if anything happened to women and children involved in the rally, qadri will be held responsible. tens of thousands supporters were camping out in islamabad. a large number were members of the parent organization but not all of them. >> i wanted to show the world, we the people in islamabad who work here and studying here, he also are supporters of him because he makes a lot of sense. >> qadri seemingly called for change and then a quick change of heart has given way to many conspiracy theories, including some sort of approval by the pakistani establishment. >> people who hav
heard was sitting in his office saying what do you think politician's x are in the next election and you hear this spontaneous analysis that was always very deep and comprehensive so he has a kind of feel for what it's going to take to close the deal. i think one of the things that's been tough for him is that as he likes to say, this isn't your grandfather's congress so he's getting used to the tea party. >> but he's good at it. he's got this joe, everybody per so that. people like him. a lot of politicians the public meets. they're in awe and they honor the person. >> like the governor of connecticut into that's not the case. but. >> people come away and genuinely like him and that's a skillset and cal he want and a communication's ability and that's very important to this administration and i -- by the way, there's this other thing about him. you can't keep him down. you really can't put him in a room and not hear him. so he's a force and why not use him? >> i also think that, you know, i no ewe're not bog to get into the tea leaves about 2016 but the vice president is not someone tha
it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to doffs notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legitimate tors. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine except everybod
jazeera, governor elect and speaker committee member who organized the event. michelle, immediate task resident, national association of hispanic journalists. larry gibbons, gannett news service. thank you all for joining us today. [applause]before becoming los angeles's 41st mayor, public service came early to antonio villaraigosa. during his youth he became a farm worker, volunteer and activist leading student walkout. this led him on a path, taking into the state assembly, city hall and the inner circle of the democratic national committee and he chaired the 2012 convention in charlotte. regarding the topic of immigration, mayor antonio villaraigosa has said the time is now to pass comprehensive immigration reform. he has slammed congress for doing nothing on the issue, yet sunday on "face the nation" he said he was heartened that the public and senators john mccain and others have been discussing solutions, but given the country's current fiscal food fight is it realistic anytime soon? republican senator marco rubio think there is a way and said so this past weekend in "the wall st
people. that might be in the next election but as pressure builds, members of congress will act to --. martha: i guess what i'm asking for in terms of a plan, are you going to put forth something that says, we, the house republicans believe that this program should be cut, this agency should be cut, these are the spending cuts we would outline in order to offset the increase in the debt ceiling? we believe that there needs to be cuts and these are what they would be? are you going to do that? >> martha, we'll get together this weekend and we'll crunch all that out. i don't want to presume there is consensus there i might adhere to. i want to do that with my colleagues but we need to lay down the broad bright line, for me, it is this. when does this budget balance? we must have cuts to go along with any debt increase. they must be substantial. there must be a line. martha: you need to sell that idea to the american people with specifics and with a plan and say we're the house gop. here's what we would do. here are the programs we would cut in order to reach parity over the next f
a breath, threat leaders that have been elected do their jobs. nobody wants to pay anymore taxes. they take 38% out of my check every week in taxes. i get back maybe $1,000 if i'm lucky. the president has a lot on his plate. he is one man speaking for 600 million. how is that to get up in the morning and realize you have everybody in the entire united states looking for you to make the right choice. host: the population in the united states is 300 million. caller: i'm sorry, even 300 million, that's one man speaking for everybody. he's got to make the right decision every second of the day. that's impossible. the country -- the laws we have in place, they've been there. they do work, just everyone has to abide by the laws. everyone should be treated equally. hypothank you for your calls and comments. a tweet -- hypocoming -- host: coming up we'll be talking about the fiscal situation in their cities and the comments yesterday by vice president biden who addressed the 300 mares in attendance on guns and gun violence. and late ter president's promises, what did he fulfill in his first term. a
of the national hispanic leadership agenda and guest of the speaker. jeff al jazeera, governor elect, national press club speaker committee member who organized today's event. and michelle who is a national spokesperson of hispanic journalists. until yesterday. [applause] before becoming the mayor of los angeles, the 41st mayor, during his youth he became a farmworker volunteer and activist leading student walkout. this led him on the path taking him state assembly. also city hall and the inner circle of the democratic national committee, where he chaired the 2012 convention in charlotte. regarding the topic of immigration, mayor antonio villaraigosa has said that the time is now to pass comprehensive immigration reform. he has slammed congress for doing nothing on the issue. yet on sunday on face the nation he said he was heartened that republican senator john mccain and others have been discussing solutions. given the country's current fiscal fights, is it realistic to expect immigration anytime soon so how does the mayor feel about local immigration initiatives? well, immigration is not the
't think the debt ceiling should be negotiable, simply because the president won the election, congress also won reelection. it should not be. it's under a false premise. if the debt ceiling is not raised, that we would go into default. that's not true unless tim geithner air this id will actually follow the law and pay the service on the debt and collect more money in taxes. every quarter when corporations pay their taxes, he can pay the debt with that. he can pay social security and pay for the military and the current cwars and medicare and medicaid. beyond that, everything is up in the air. he can do the things that are required. simply because the president decides he wants it raised because it has been raised in the past for other people, that is like saying we will ever be responsible, because if you win an election, automatically get what you want. it does not work. you cannot run a country where every site gets whatever it wants just because they win. host: a tweet -- caller: it's not money already spent. there's a difference between actual spending and proposed spending. when
stick. >> what about spending cuts? >> we've heard so much about it during the presidential election and now that the president has been gnawiinaugurd for the second term. how much leverage do the republicans have. and the president didn't touch on either of those thing in his inaugural address. >> he made clear in his inaugural address he was not, the cuts in medicare and social security, and newest entitlement, middle class health insurance entitlement. he made it clear he doesn't want to do that and that's where the republicans want to go, because those are, and this is agreed and the president use today point this out the biggest drivers of deficits and debt. he's drawing a line he's not going to go there. republicans will be-hard pressed to go there, but at least in their point of view, hold on the line of spending and not go up as much as it was supposed to. >> and chris, you mentioned this only lasts until may 18th. is that what we can expect now days from our lawmakers, forever of the kicking of the can down the field and do we only-- the best we can hope for is a three-month
and latin america social progress of governments being elected to power, getting rid of all dictatorships, old rule by the popular -- military, and giving the popular will a chance to bring more progressive leaders to power. but that really was from the 1960's to the 1990's, you have throughout latin america, the role of these dictators and military leaders that were largely backed by the united states. >> i want to go to a part of the film that deals with the assassination of archbishop oscar romero on march 24, 1980, in el salvador. this clip features the voices of sister pat murray, former u.s. ambassador to el salvador robert white, and sister terry alexander, mary nell missionary. >> his assassination -- in church -- stunned the entire nation. >> as the crowd started to grow, they realized that this was going to be a very difficult time. and we could see all the party is that were on the roofs. all of the sudden, there was a shot fired. then the bomb went off. the everybody just scattered. then the korea opened fire -- guardia opened fire. oh, lord. important that the world know that
, the latino vote very important in getting obama re-elected, and now, you know, the event that the republican party, it seems, that they really do need to change their thinking with latinos, and the issue important to us like immigration. i am very excited about, you know, the way the country is looking at latinos and to realize that, you know, we are an important part of the society. we need to work hard to create immigration reform to help those here to definitely move up, and to become an important power in politics and sectors of the society. very exciting times. >> host: speaking of the 2012 vote and latino vote, did you vote for president obama? are you a citizen today? >> guest: i am a citizen today, yes, aam. >> host: did you support president obama for re-elect? >> guest: i did, i did, i voted for him. >> host: can you tell us why? >> guest: i voted for him because, first of all, di not like the way romney spoke about latinos, about immigrants in general, about what he wanted to do with the immigrant population. i did north support that at all, and i do think that obama is doing thin
. >> didn't we do this for the last two years? the election is over. the whole barack obama is part of this elitists is a dead argument. it doesn't move things forward. what the nra should be talking about is let's make sure people have to be licensed properly to have their guns. make sure people know how to use a gun if someone comes into their home. these ads and attacks raises money, gets people talking, and it doesn't help the nra's reputation with the public. >> ron, jason has a point. this could create a backlash. a "washington post" poll shows 44% have an unfavorable view of the nra's leadership. >> i don't think that matters to the nra. what their goal is is to protect gun rights, the rights of the second amendment. they're going to do everything possible to make sure that happens. you know, you have republicans and democrats joining together. that will end up joining together to fight president obama's proposals. you have red state senators in the senate, harry reid extremely cool to this proposal as well as pat leahy, a democrat who will take his time and look this over. i
, at the 16th of january, we have 28 finally deaths. when i became mayor, when i first put my election, and mexico the term is usually three years. my state is the only state that lasts for years. we decided we needed to change the model and made that a partnership and assign the retired general to become chief of police. a couple of months into the new administration, we had the police force, police officers didn't want to work with the general. and of course we were wondering if it had to do some with low wages for the betterment of the working conditions. the strike was orchestrated and they didn't want to work under a military chief. we have to take a very tough decision because there was something totally out of our hands. what we did is we decided to fire and to disappear the police officer department. of course after they heard i had taken the decision to disappear, they decided to go back to work and we justify one condition. you can go back to work if you do three things. number one. number two coming take a polygraph and number three can be said that due to an economic invest
supported president obama in his re-election this year. so many hispanic americans came out for him. why do you that i happened? >> well, it's very easy. you know, obama and the democrats have the best option for the latinos. immigration reform is on the table. the dream act. so, you know, the latinos here in the united states are so powerful and their voice needs to be heard. they need to be treated as first class citizens. >> reporter: in addition to celebrities, campaign volunteers came from around the country. kelly jacobs traveled from mississippi, literally, wearing her support. how many sequins are on your dress? >> 4,000 total. >> reporter: and these are all done by hand? >> they're antique shield sequ n sequi sequins. >> reporter: a lot of work behind them and ahead if they are to help president obama deliver in the second term. but tonight, it was just time for a good party. >> it looks like a good party. brianna keilar, thank you. >> everyone talking about the jason wu dress. >> twice. >> twice in a row. all right. moving on to some other news. it is the testimony that many ameri
to use against them and we are less than 2 years away from a mid term election which i think he thinks is possible to win back control of his house from his party. >> okay. but don't you if the president gets the debt ceiling raised with no commitment to spending cuts in the future, if he gets a ban of assault weapons, ammunition, more stringent background checks that this will divide the republican party. say they squeak it through in the house say boehner makes it happen. which i don't think he's going to by the way. then the republican party fractures it becomes weaker. the strategy the president is employing is i am not going to compromise on the debt ceiling. i don't know what he will do on gun control but don't compromise on the debt ceiling. do it by executive order and then say it is your fault. either way he gets the republicans. if they pass they get weakened if they oppose they demonize. >> it is a smart political strategy. >> it could be but it worked so far but not 100 percent. remember republicans got control of the house of representatives during his term after his first
and was elected to the michigan state senate in 1964 and service the senate minority leader. under the current administration he was under the agency for international development and was elected to the house in 1980 to four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march 2010, he won the battle of chairman of the ways and means committee. there is no embargo and breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed not to use video of the sessions session for at least two hours after the represent. to help c-span, if you happen to be sitting there microphone and you ask a question, pullet close to you. if not, they will come around you with a boom microphone. finally, if you send me a signal, i will do my best to answer questions and comments. >> thank you all for joining us. i was thinking yesterday as i was listening to the president about past conflicts over the deficit reduction. mark and i were talking about how far back we go. it is a few years. and i remembered him of the earlier sessions that we had. gramm-rudman one and two and gran member holland. i've googled it for all
republicans elected in 1994 and then became a clinton conspiracyialyial theorist. so i think the voters of his district know how to treat that behavior, by senning him home. >> stephanie: a new poll finds that president obama's approval rating 55% approve 43% disapprove. so i -- doesn't that make you crazy, karl when these republicans go on and say the american people -- >> well they mean, you know the people in the try corner hats. the various koch brothers. >> stephanie: yeah, all of the koch brothers. >> yeah. by the way they would be in a much better place as a party, and we would be in a much better place as a country if they knew what the american people wanted. they will win elections from time to time in the near future but unless they change their stances on issues, unless they come around to issues that are popular with young people and single people and women and gay people and people of color -- >> stephanie: most carbon-based life forms. >> yeah unless they come around on those issues in 15 years there won't be a republican party like it looks today
is the first african-american elected. he used language interesting to me. that we owe a lot to our founding documents. he referred a lot to the founding documents, not a lot to the founding documents. the founding fathers owned slaves. >> a process ever since. let's play a little bit about what he said. i think the constant looking back to the constitution was a very strong theme in his speech yesterday. let's play that. >> we hold these truths to be self-evident. that all men are creating equal. that they are endowed by their creator with certainly unalienable rights, and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. >> and with that, he sort of launched into not an olive branch, he launched into here is the preparation for the fight ahead for the next four years. is that how you saw it? >> i saw it almost a campaign speech for 2014. we need congress, need to get this thing done, yeah. i saw it that way. and very interesting. the republicans and democrats are both in this death embrace. they each have their own constituents, throwing a lot of money at them on both sides. rep
. that is the message the president is taking to the public right now and with the recent election results behind him he is hoping to get republicans to bow and get out of the way of that in terms of trying to hold up a debt limit and let the economy take off. republicans are trying to figure out how do we get leverage to change the level of spending long term in the country? that is where the two sides are at odds in a very difficult way. >> right. finally a lot of chatter this morning about the portrait of the president always sort of encapsulates a moment in time. people either commenting on the degree to which he's gotten gray which happens to a lot of chief executives, but also some say, john, looking satisfied with a win in the last election. what is your take? >> i totally agree with that. he is grayer than he was but just as confident, some would say cocky and the picture captures that. this is a president who a lot of people thought because of the state of the economy wasn't going to win re-election. he did. he faced down the republican campaign and won it and now he is saying, hey. i'm on top
during december's fiscal cliff negotiations, representative john boehner winning re-election as speaker of the house. this congress -- the most diverse in history, with a record number of women and minorities. among them is the first buddhist to join the senate, as well as the first hindu and the first openly bisexual woman in the house. secretary of state hillary clinton heading back to work after being released from a new york city hospital following treatment for a blood clot. many lawmakers demanding clinton testify about the terror attack in benghazi before voting on her potential successor, nominee senator john kerry. google chairman eric schmidt and former new mexico governor bill richardson arriving in north korea. his visit drawing criticism from the state department because it comes only weeks after a controversial north korean rocket launch. the delegation defends its trip to the communist nation. >> this is a private humanitarian visit. we're here as individual american citizens, looking at the humanitarian situation. we're gonna ask about the american detainee who's here. w
it down to the american public. and why was he doing that yesterday? because mid term elections are coming up and he wants to blame the republicans now -- >>eric: in two years. can i take issue with that? i don't think he was very good yesterday. i think the american people were watching him. they saw a guy saying give me the checkbook, i got it. i'll take it from here. there's a couple of things he said. he said i won't negotiate with a gun to the head of the american people. i'm not sure that was really resonating with a lot of american people. also he said we saved $2.5 trillion over the last couple of -- where? >>gretchen: i'm not saying everything he said is resonating. >>eric: he said $2.5 trillion -- he was very successful when it came to campaign. he thinks he is still campaigning. >>gretchen: but he is still campaigning for mid term elections. that's my point. >>steve: i think the american people are like you've got four years. you're already complaining about the other guys. we're going to have two or four more years of this. we've given you $16 trillion. can't you live within yo
't rely just on the fact that your elected representatives are in favor. you can write to them and say merely that i want to vote for this, what you have to do is write to them and say, i want you to use your influence to persuade others to use your influence as chair of the appropriations committee or as a senior member of the minority party in the house of representatives. it is more than just about that we have to ask of our elected officials. we have to ask her leadership as well. >> i will just add on to that. my own feeling is that to get some change along the lines, i think you were suggesting that it will require more gun owners to speak out in favor of common sense regulations. i think that the politicians who feel like they have to work hard for their nra a+ ratings would maybe feel less like that is necessary if they had another group of gunowners who could validate what they can civil to be regulations on firearms. as has been alluded to, but we will go into more detail tomorrow, the vast majority of gun owners are supportive of most of the measures that we are talking abou
purposes. >> i just want to say the whole business about people use today is mitt romney lost the election with the whole horse and bayonet. i wish would stay away from that because the president said were not using bayonets anymore. so it's a different weaponry, but the other thing missing here i think when i talk about overreach, the e-mail you read in general kristol's observation is people say, why do you need an assault weapon? nobody needs an assault weapon, but that's not the issue. by somebody in this country need to have a trial by jury? by somebody who's robbed a bank need to have the fourth amendment having a search warrant before you issue? nobody needs those things. the issue as they were enshrined in the constitution. so you have to make sure you work with what the supreme court has said. the right to bear arms is an individual right. the first of all affect the value can you can have reasonable restrictions, so the path forward for responsible legislators is to find out what the reasonable restrictions are that save lives. i think the taking of when human life is a horrible
into the national check system. >> sean: when you said this, for example, we use armed guards to protect our elected politicians, our president, our mayors, our capital officials, money in a bank, hollywood stars, they hire bo dietl, right? we have courthouses and stadiums, office buildings and airports, they all have armed guards, right. >> sure. >> sean: why were people attacking, and suggesting maybe retired police officers or military be put in schools to prevent this from happening. >> it's ridiculous, they attacked me for opposing what doesn't work, one more gun law and attacked me for supporting what does work which is school security. what it really boils down to is the sanctimonious hypocrisy of the political and media elite in the country. most of their kids when they go to school they're protected by the police in the school and armed security. >> do they do that at colleges around the country. armed guards. we do and a third of the schools have security right now what president clinton proposed this years ago and yet, wayne says lets make people safe and they call me crazy, everything un
, for example, we use armed guards to protect our elected politicians, our president, our mayors, our capital officials, money in a bank, hollywood stars, they hire bo dietl, right? we have courthouses and stadiums, office buildings and airports, they all have armed guards, right. >> sure. >> sean: why were people attacking, and suggesting maybe retired police officers or military be put in schools to prevent this from happening. >> it's ridiculous, they attacked me for opposing what doesn't work, one more gun law and attacked me for supporting what does work which is school security. what it really boils down to is the sanctimonious hypocrisy of the political and media elite in the country. most of their kids when they go to school they're protected by the police in the school and armed security. >> do they do that at colleges around the country. armed guards. we do and a third of the schools have security right now what president clinton proposed this years ago and yet, wayne says lets make people safe and they call me crazy, everything under the sun. i could care less because what i'm prop
casone. cheryl: if only that were true. anyway, millions of kids grow up having dreams being elected as president of the united states and moving into the white house but what if you had to buy the white house, to live there? your hopes might be dashed right now. u.s. home prices have risen for nine straight months the most recent home price index posted its largest increase since 2006. how much would it cost to buy one of the most glamorous, is horrific homes in our nation? real estate web company, zillow, estimates that 1600 pennsylvania avenue in washington, d.c. has a current value of $294.9 million. $294.9 million. so president obama and his family first moved into that home in january of 2009, the white house's value has risen 7% from $275.6 million. so put your checkbooks away. >>> let's say you are not in the market to buy a house. instead you're looking to make money on the housing market? and what we're hearing about the housing recovery, where should you be looking? we have angel capital cofounder and cio joins me in a fox business exclusive. i want to talk about your fund
a voice to hold our elected officials accountable to listen to the conversation that's going on in the public. and if we can do that, i don't think anything should be off the table. and if we can't, nothing will pass. the white house has done its job. we'll appreciate their continued leadership on this. now it's up to us, up to the american public to make our voice heard. and it's not time to -- >> we appreciate you joining us on the phone. we know you're on a train. jessica yellin as well. kyung l a. h joins us with the news bulletin. >>> andrew cuomo today sign tough new gun legislation into law, limits gun clips to seven rounds maximum. the national rifle association denounced the measure, saying it will have no impact on public safety and crime. now turning to breaking news from capitol hill, the house has approved a $50 billion aid package for areas hit hard by superstorm sandy. that's on top of the nearly $10 billion in flood relief money approved late last month. the senate will either have to take up the house bill or restart with a new bill for the $50 billion, which
they can to make this is a safer nation. it is up to the american public to rally a voice to hold elected official accountable to listen to the conversation that is going on in the public. if we can do that, i don't think that anything should be off the table. if we can't, nothing will pass. the white house has done its job. we will appreciate their continued leadership on this. but now it is up to us, the american public to make our voice heard. it's not time to start to -- any solution. >> appreciate you joining us. i know you are on the train. >> a month and a day after the newtown killings, new york governor como signed tough legislation in to law. it limits gun clips to seven rounds maximum. the national rifle association denounced the measure saying it will have no impact on public safety and crime. >>> turning to breaking news from capitol hill, the house approved a $50 billion aid package for areas hit hard by superstorm sandy. that's on top of the 10 billion in flood relief money approved last month. the senate will have to take up the house bill or restart with a new bill for th
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